Home > Electronics, Greentropia, Projects > Reviewing dual-layer PCBWay PCBs

Reviewing dual-layer PCBWay PCBs

This review is an addendum to the first part in the Greentropia Base Board article series [1]. Here we have a look at the PCB ordering options, process and product delivered by PCBWay and conclude with impressions of the Greentropia Base realized with these PCBs.

Much to the delight of professional hardware developers and hobbyists alike, prices for dual layer FR4 PCBs have come down to a point where shipping from Asia has become the major cost factor. An online price comparison [2] brings up the usual suspects, with new and lesser-known PCB manufacturers added to the mix.

In this competitive environment, reputation is just as important as consistently high quality and great service. Thus PCBWay [3] reached out to us to talk about their PCB manufacturing process and products by providing free PCBs, which we accepted as an opportunity to fast-lane the Greentropia Base board [4], a primary building block of the ongoing Greentropia indoor farming project [5].

Ordering the PCBs

PCB specifications guide the design process and show up again when ordering the actual PCBs. They are at the beginning and the end of the board design process – hopefully without escalation to smaller drill sizes, trace widths and layer count.

The manufacturing capabilities [6] are obviously just bounds for the values selected in a definitive set of design rules, leaving room for a trade-off between design challenges and manufacturing cost. Sometimes relaxing the minimum trace width and spacing from 5/5mil (0.125 mm) to 6/6mil (0.15 mm) can make a noticeable difference in PCB cost. And then again, switching from 0.3 mm to 0.25 mm minimum drill size can make fan-out and routing in tight spaces happen, albeit at a certain price.

Logically we will need to look at the price tag of standard and extended manufacturing capabilities. The following picture displays pricing as of the writing of this article:pcbway_order_spec

For some options the pricing is very attractive. Most notably an array of attractive colours is available at no additional charge. With RoHS and REACH directives in place however it remains to be seen whether lead-free hot air surface levelling (HASL) will become the new standard at no added cost.

Luckily for our project we do not need to stray far from the well-trodden path and just opt for the lead-free finish on a blue 1.6mm PCB.

The ordering process is hassle-free and provides frequent status updates:

pcbway_order_progress

A month after our order, an online gerber viewer [7] was introduced to help designers quickly verify their gerber output before uploading them for the order. It must be noted however that this online feature is at an early stage and is expected to provide layer de-duplication, automatic and consistent color assignment and appropriate z-order and better rendering speed in the future.

pcbway_gerber_viewer

Gerbv [8] is a viable alternative which also provides last-minute editing capabilities (e.g. deleting a stray silkscreen element).

Visual inspection

PCBs were received within one week after ordering, packaged in a vacuum sealed bag and delivered in a cardboard box with foam sheets for shock protection. One extra PCB was also included in the shipment, which is nice to have.

The boards present with cleanly machined edges, well-aligned drill pattern and stop masks on both sides and without scratches or defects. The silkscreen has good coverage and high resolution. Adhesion of stop mask and silkscreen printing are excellent. The lead-free HASL finish is glossy and flat, and while we couldn’t put it to the test with this layout, the TSSOP footprint results suggest no issues with TSSOP, TQFP and BGA components down to 0.5mm pitch.

The board identifier is thankfully hidden underneath an SOIC component in the final product. Pads show the expected probe marks from e-test. without affecting the final reflow result. No probe damage to the pads is evident.

Realising the project

We conclude with some impressions of the assembled PCBs, which we will use in the following articles to build an automated watering system.

Here we see our signature paws with the 2 mm wide capacitor C15 next to them for scale. The pitch of the vertical header is 2.54 mm. Tenting of the vias is also consistent and smooth.

greentropia_base_mask_quality

Good mask alignment and print quality.

The next picture shows successful reflow of components of different size and thermal mass after a lead-free reflow cycle in a convection oven. As the PCBs were properly sealed and fresh, no issues with delamination occured.

greentropia_base_different_size_reflow_result

DC-DC section reflow result.

The reflow result with the lead-free HASL PCB and the stencil ordered along with it is also quite promising. No solder bridges were observed despite lack of mask webbing, which is likely due to our mask relief settings and minimum webbing width. Very thin webbing can be destroyed during HASL, so if the additional safety in the 0.15 to 0.2 mm between the pads is needed it’s worth checking back with the manufacturer.

greentropia_base_tssop_hasl_result

TSSOP reflow result.

While testing the 5V to 12V boost converter, it was found that it worked without issues. Initial testing of the ADC was also promising. As we continue to test the boards over the coming time we’ll find out whether there are zero issues, but so far it appears that everything is working as it should.

Maya

[1] https://mayaposch.wordpress.com/2019/03/06/keeping-plants-happy-with-the-greentropia-base-board-part-1/
[2] https://pcbshopper.com/
[3] https://www.pcbway.com/
[4] https://github.com/MayaPosch/Greentropia_Base
[5] http://www.nyantronics.com/greentropia.php
[6] https://www.pcbway.com/capabilities.html
[7] https://www.pcbway.com/project/OnlineGerberViewer.html
[8] http://gerbv.sourceforge.net/

  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: